Olympic Lifts

Olympic Lifts

The Snatch

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In the snatch, the bar is pulled in one explosive motion from the floor to full arm's length overhead. In order to make the lift easier to perform, athletes typically bend their legs quickly while the bar is rising in order to catch the bar at arm's length. The combined attributes of great strength and blinding speed are needed to accomplish this challenging event effectively. The best lifters in the world (in the lighter weight classes can lift as much as 2.5 times their bodyweight in the Snatch). The best uperheavyweightweightlifters in history have lifted nearly 500 lb./227.5 kg. in this lift.*

*Taken from The Weightlifting Encyclopedia, by Artie Dreschler

 

Incorrect movements and positions for all lifts

  • Pulling from the hang.
  • Touching the platform with any part of the body other than the feet.
  • Uneven or incomplete extension of the arms, at the finish of the lift. .
  • Pause during the extension of the arms.
  • Finishing with a press-out.
  • Bending and extending the elbows during the recovery.
  • Leaving the platform during the execution of the lift, i.e. touching the area outside the platform with any part of the body.
  • Replacing the barbell on the platform before the referees’ signal.
  • Dropping the barbell after the referees’ signal.
  • Failing to finish with the feet and the barbell in line and parallel to the plane of the trunk.
  • Failing to replace the complete barbell on the platform, i.e. the complete barbell must first touch the platform.

The Clean and Jerk

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In the clean and jerk (C&J), the bar is also lifted to full arm's length overhead. However, although it is considered one event, the C&J is really two lifts that must be completed one immediately after the other. In the clean, the bar is raised (pulled) in an explosive motion from the floor to a point of rest approximately at the level of the shoulders. (The rules permit lifting the bar within a zone from the chest above the nipples to a position above the shoulders, as long as the arms are in a fully bent position with the bar resting on the hands in the latter case).

The second part of the C&J, the jerk, consists of bending the legs and then extending both the arms and the legs to bring the bar to full arm's length over the head in one explosive motion. In order to make the lift easier to perform, athletes typically drop into a "split" position, or merely bend their legs quickly while the bar is rising in order to catch the bar at arm's length. Since the athlete is lifting the bar in two stages in the C&J, heavier weights can be lifted in the C&J than in the snatch.

The best lifters in the world in the lighter weight classes can lift as much as 3 times their bodyweight in the C&J. The best superheavyweight lifters in history have lifted nearly 600 lb./272.5 kg. in this lift. Often referred to as the "King (or Queen) of the lifts", the C&J is the greatest single test of overall strength and power known.*

*taken from The Weightlifting Encyclopedia, by Artie Dreschler